Freak of Nature

rawr.

Hi! I am a 22 yo bisexual/homoflexible gender-fluid dude. I studied wildlife and conservation biology and sociology/anthropology in college annnnnd...
I'm going to be a cage dancer.
and my name is Sammy :)

Ask me anythingNext pageArchive

I’m learning some really great moves from this guy!

amazelife:

msdeonb:

theveekay:

gentillysavage:

cyb3ranthy:

thisiseverydayracism:

fuckyeahfeminists:

Melissa Harris-Perry, Black Female Voices: Who Is Listening?

I love this woman

this.

This succinctly explains why black people shame each other.

theveekay

!!!!!!

Perfect!!!!! This is such a hard concept to explain. Ughhhh I love this woman.

She is the best!

(Source: exgynocraticgrrl, via blackbricks93)

cool-critters:

Takahē (Porphyrio hochstetteri)

The Takahē, Notornis, or South Island Takahē is a flightless bird indigenous to New Zealand and belonging to the rail family. It was thought to be extinct after the last four known specimens were taken in 1898. However, after a carefully planned search effort the bird was rediscovered in the Murchison Mountains, where it is still found nowadays. The Takahē is monogamous, builds a bulky nest under bushes and scrub, and lays one to three buff eggs. It is territorial. Although the Takahe now finds protection in the Fiordland National park it is still highly endangered. photo credits: wikipedia, animalscamp, nzbirdsonline

(Source: best-of-memes, via wild-guy)

earthseas-ky:

morphology (by KyL 2014)

helmet urchin (Colobocentrotus atratus)An urchin with flattened spines adapted for areas with high wave action.

(Source: sandandglass)

oneheartoverthemoon:

ba614:

THIS IS A PICTURE THAT SOMEONE TOOK WHO WORKS ON AN OIL RIG IN TEXAS.HE WANTED TO GET A SHOT OF THE LIGHTNING THAT WAS FLASHING BY. HE WAS UNAWARE OF THE TORNADO UNTIL THE LIGHTNING ILLUMINATED IT.This has been called a one-in-a-million photo; taken south of Ft. Stockton, Texas.

Holy shit.
rhamphotheca:

Cleveland Metropark Zoo Working to Help Threatened Spotted Turtles
by Jean Bonechak
Cleveland Metroparks Zoo and a Northeast Ohio park district are working in tandem to ensure the limited spotted turtle (Clemmys guttata) population in Ohio doesn’t disappear.
The reptile is on the state’s threatened species list and without intervention might become endangered.
“If we don’t do something about it they may disappear in 10 years,” said Paul Pira, a Geauga Park District biologist.
Though not threatened in other areas of the U.S., the prevalence of spotted turtles in the northeastern states and Canada is extremely limited.
The species, which is naturally slow to mature and reproduce, also is the victim of predators, especially raccoons. A loss of its preferred wetlands habitat coupled with an illegal pet trade adds to the creatures’ scarcity…
(read more: Morning Journal)

"

Far fewer articles describe the other constitutional violations taking place on the streets of Missouri, and those violations are every bit as urgent as the infringements on speech and assembly. We’ve seen very little coverage of the use of tear gas and rubber bullets as constitutional violations. But the due process clause bans the police from using excessive force even when they are within their rights to control a crowd or arrest a suspect. And tear gas is in a category all its own. Not only is unleashing it into a crowd an unconstitutional exercise of excessive force, but its use is banned by international law. That’s one of the reasons Amnesty International sent a team of investigators to Ferguson. Similarly, the use of rubber bullets under the circumstances is also unconstitutional. Some kinds of rubber bullets are more unconstitutional than others, because certain types are more likely to injure and maim.

But excessive use of force is only the beginning. Pulling people out of the crowd and arresting them without probable cause (or for being 2 feet off the sidewalk) violates the Fourth and 14th Amendments, particularly when those arrests are disproportionately of black protesters. The general arrest statistics in Ferguson reveal what looks to be a stunning constitutional problem. According to an annual report last year from the Missouri attorney general’s office, Ferguson police were twice as likely to arrest blacks during traffic stops as they were whites. Emerging reports about racial disparities in Ferguson’s criminal justice system and the ways in which the town uses trivial violations by blacks to bankroll the city (and disenfranchise offenders) all represent constitutional questions. Why don’t we characterize them as such? These are not just violations of the law or bad policy. These are violations of our most basic and fundamental civil liberties.

Of course, probably the biggest potential constitutional violation of all—and eyewitness testimony suggests this as a real possibility—is the alleged use of excessive force by the police in shooting an unarmed 18-year-old at least six times. Under the law, each of those bullets must be separately justified, as necessary, even if one believes the officer’s story that Michael Brown rushed him. To be sure, the news media has covered this, but very few of us talk about the shooting as a potential violation of the Constitution. Remember, the Constitution is the foundational bargain between the people and their government, the framework on which our legal order rests. When we fail to talk about the arrests, searches, racial profiling, and government brutality in constitutional terms, we are failing to capture how profoundly the state has betrayed its promises.

"

- Ferguson’s constitutional crisis: First Amendment violations are only part of the story. (via dendroica)

(via dendroica)